Archives de catégorie : Activité physique/Physical activity

Climate change & physical activity behaviours : A challenge for health psychology

In November, I gave a talk for the European Health Psychology Society SIG Equity, Global Health and Sustainability. Slides are available here.

In conclusion, I presented an updated definition of health behaviors : “actions and patterns of actions within a context that enable human choices that result in reduced or net zero carbon, energy, water, and ecological footprint and (in)directly result in equitable improvement, restoration, and maintenance of health for humans and nonhuman health for current and future generations” (1).

I also presented a set of priorities for health psychology community:

  • To systematically present climate change consequences in courses
  • A responsibility of ‘senior researchers’ to reshape their research questions in CC perspectives
  • To develop collaborations with environmental/climate  psychology) researchers
  • To accelerate implementation of effective interventions to cope with CC/health issues
  • To prioritize social change >>> technology based solutions
    To develop multilevel interventions with multi- or interdisciplinary perspectives
  • To reorganize our research practices (carbon footprint of congress)

Finally, I shared the link to download our info-graphics (open access).

Chevance G, Fresán U, Hekler E, Edmondson D, Lloyd S j, Ballester J, et al. Thinking health-related behaviors in a climate change context: A narrative review [Internet]. OSF Preprints; 2021 [cited 2021 May 19]. Available from: https://osf.io/pb8vc/

Complex associations between air pollution, insomnia symptoms and physical activity

In a preprint co-authored with G. Chevance et al. (1), we examined the associations between climate change consequences and health behaviors. We identified a set of (bi)directional associations between natural hazards, rising sea level, greenhouse gas emission, temperature increase and the following behaviors : alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, water consumption, preventive behaviors, sleep, food related behaviors and physical activity (PA) domains. We synthesized these associations with this figure.

This system map offers a “meta” and simplified perspective of previous studied associations. However, we did not include the potential associations between health behaviors. Indeed, these associations are not well identified and may be different in function of the time scale (i.e., daily associations vs long term association), study participant characteristics and assessment tools (see e.g., see the following reviews for PA sleep associations at short and long term (2,3)).
A recent cross-sectional study investigated the associations of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with insomnia symptoms in a large Chinese sample. Furthermore, the authors examined whether PA domains had a potential “buffering effect”.
In the perspective of our review, it’s particularly relevant because we could improve the subsection about sleep, PA domains, and air pollution (4). Also, China is one of the most polluted countries in the world.

Strengths of this study:

  • -residents >3 years in their current residence
  • relative good measure of insomnia symptoms
  • good control of indoor air pollution and environmental factors (e.g., temperature)

I synthesized Xu et al. findings with the following slides (4). A buffering effect of physical activity was found for leisure PA and moderate PA “doses”. High levels of total and occupational PA accentuated the air pollution – insomnia association. In brief, the potential positive role of PA varied in term of domain, dose and air pollution measures.

 

 

This study is a good illustration of health behaviors associations complexity. In a climate change perspective (i.e., higher level of air pollution in cities around the world in next decades), physical activity promotion and insomnia prevention/treatment strategies should be revised.

  • 1. Chevance G, Fresán U, Hekler E, Edmondson D, Lloyd S j, Ballester J, et al. Thinking health-related behaviors in a climate change context: A narrative review [Internet]. OSF Preprints; 2021 [cited 2021 May 19]. Available from: https://osf.io/pb8vc/
  • 2. Kredlow MA, Capozzoli MC, Hearon BA, Calkins AW, Otto MW. The effects of physical activity on sleep: a meta-analytic review. J Behav Med. 2015 Jun;38(3):427–49.
  • 3. Atoui S, Chevance G, Romain A-J, Kingsbury C, Lachance J-P, Bernard P. Daily associations between sleep and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Medicine Reviews. 2021 Jun;57:101426.
  • 4. Xu J, Zhou J, Luo P, Mao D, Xu W, Nima Q, et al. Associations of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and physical activity with insomnia in Chinese adults. Science of The Total Environment. 2021 Oct;792:148197.

 

Impacts of wildfires on physical activity

I write this blog article during an important forest fire in British Columbia (Canada), occurring during an extreme heat wave in the same geographical area. The last Lancet report on health and climate change called it : the ‘converging crises’ (1). Climate projections indicate wildfires will increase in frequency and intensity in the U.S, Canada, Australia, Russia… What are the effects of wildfires on physical activity patterns ?

Cruz et al examined the effects of bushfires on accelerometer measured physical activity among exposed and control children (245 vs 344, 8-10 years, Australia) (2). Additionally, they modelized the association between Air Quality Index (AQI) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in exposed children (with sub analyses for sex and socioeconomic status). Authors collected PA data for their multi-center interventional study, and the bushfires occurred between the end of intervention and first follow-up measures. Children were classified as affected by bushfires if they were exposed to AQI >100 for 3 consecutive days, and their school received targeted advice to avoid outdoor Pas. Their statistical analyses were well-adapted and sophisticated.

Children’s physical activity was not strongly influenced by the presence of smoke during bushfires. Findings were similar for MVPA, VPA, MPA during or outside school hours or after the inclusion of temperature as covariable. During the school time, an AQI of 1 standard deviation increase was associated with a decrease of 2 and 0.6 daily minutes for MPA and VPA, respectively. The curvilinear models suggested that AQI >737 (AQI > 200 = ‘hazardous’) was associated with a drastic MVPA reduction among exposed children. This ‘tipping point’ was not different for children with living in family with low or high socioeconomic background.

Authors suggested that the relative stable PA level during the wildfire episode may be explained by a possible PA indoor practices or family/teachers might not follow the Australian Education Department recommendation about outdoor PA restrictions. Consequently, the children might have been exposed to high level of air pollution.

A US study examined the association between four AQI classes (ranged from moderate to hazardous air quality) and daily number of steps (measured with fitbit) among adults living in California during 2017-2018 wildfire seasons (N > 1000) (3). A significant 18% reduction in daily step count was found when the AQI exceeded 200 compared with AQIs < 100. Similar results were observed after multivariable adjustment, but sex was missing among the covariables.

Finally, another PA characteristic has been examined: active travel in urban context. Doubleday et al. (4) used the bicycle and pedestrian counters data in Seattle (Washington state) to examine the effects of wildfire smoke events. They compared daily bicycle and pedestrian counts across 3 periods, 20 days before wildfires, during wildfire (>3 consecutive days with PM2.5 >15), and 20 days after.

A significant decrease of active travel frequency was observed during the second and larger of two wildfire smoke events (2018, see figure). Findings also showed a slow return to pre-wildfire smoke event physical activity levels in some areas.

This significant PA decrease could be observed only for 2018 because wildfire smoke events were more intense, but also by an improvement of risk reduction messages dissemination by local authorities.

 

 

  • 1. Watts N, Amann M, Arnell N, Ayeb-Karlsson S, Beagley J, Belesova K, et al. The 2020 report of The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: responding to converging crises. The Lancet. 2021 Jan;397(10269):129–70.
  • 2. del Pozo Cruz B, Hartwig TB, Sanders T, Noetel M, Parker P, Antczak D, et al. The effects of the Australian bushfires on physical activity in children. Environment International. 2021 Jan 1;146:106214.
  • 3. Rosenthal DG, Vittinghoff E, Tison GH, Pletcher MJ, Olgin JE, Grandis DJ, et al. Assessment of Accelerometer-Based Physical Activity During the 2017-2018 California Wildfire Seasons. JAMA Network Open. 2020 Sep 30;3(9):e2018116.
  • 4. Doubleday A, Choe Y, Busch Isaksen TM, Errett NA. Urban bike and pedestrian activity impacts from wildfire smoke events in Seattle, WA. Journal of Transport & Health. 2021 Jun;21:101033.

Une histoire des militants dans le sport

L’approche historique et décalée des pratiques sportives a toujours été attrayante pour moi (voir les deux ouvrages présentés sur le blogue). Elle facilite la mise en perspective du rôle des activités physiques, des loisirs et du sport au sein de la société.

Les Éditions de l’atelier, avec le soutien de la Fédération sportive et gymnique du travail (FSGT), ont publié “Terrains de jeux, terrains de luttes. Militant.e.s du sport” de N. Kssis-Martov. L’ouvrage est inscrit dans la collection ‘Celles et ceux’ qui présente les personnes, souvent méconnues, ayant oeuvrées aux transformations sociales en France. Les textes présentés sont courts, clairs et surtout bien illustrés.

L’auteur y présente une multitude de sportifs engagés à travers la Commune, le Front populaire, la Guerre d’Espagne, ou encore la Résistance durant la seconde guerre mondiale ou la Guerre d’Algérie. On s’aperçoit que les multiples débats, conflits, rassemblements entre les mouvements de gauche se sont souvent traduits dans milieu fédéral associatif. Même si la place de la FSGT y semble prépondérante.

Quelques points que je retiens :

  • La Fédération Sportive du Travail comptait, des 1922, une soixantaine section féminine au sein des clubs.
  • Rino Della Negra, resistant sportif, memebre de FRT-MOI qui a joué au Red Star, et dont une tribune porte encore le nom.
  • Les différentes visions du football, d’un côté JM Brohm avec son sport opium du peuple et de l’autre L Maitan qui défendait une vision populaire du football

Pour aller plus loin, un entretien avec l’auteur, Éloge de la passe: changer le sport pour changer le monde (Editions Libertaires), la BD Un maillot pour l’Algérie, et certainement (mais pas encore lu) Une histoire populaire du football.

Quand patiner ne sera plus qu’un souvenir : le changement climatique et l’activité physique de plein air

Au mois de décembre dernier, j’ai eu l’occasion de pouvoir réaliser une présentation pour les membres du Réseau, un rassemblement québécois d’intervenants dans le domaine de l’activité physique de plein air.

L’objet de cette présentation était de mettre en lumière les enjeux actuels et futurs des activités physiques de plein air dans le contexte du changement climatique. Après une introduction qui rappelle les conclusions du Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat, illustrées par des exemples canadiens, j’ai brièvement présenté les conclusions de notre revue de littérature sur l’activité physique et le changement climatique (voir le précédent article sur cette question). Ensuite, j’ai illustré les enjeux de l’activité physique de plein air avec une série d’études nord-américaines portant notamment sur les activités de plein air dans les parcs fédéraux mais aussi les possibilités de plus en plus réduites de patinage en extérieur ou de ski alpin au Québec. Je vous laisse lire les conclusions et recommandations dans les dernières diapos de la présentation ci-dessous.